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  • September 29, 2014 3:10 PM | Joey Juhasz-Lukomski (Administrator)

    SBBIKE will now be providing bike valet at the Saturday Santa Barbara Farmers Market!  Look for our tent just inside the Cota St. Entrance.  As always, the service is free.  If you feel like helping out, sign up to volunteer with the link below:


    First Shift

    Second Shift

  • September 27, 2014 10:00 AM | Howard Booth (Administrator)



    We're at the SOL Food Festival right know!


    Ready to park your bike so that you can enjoy the SOL Food Festival and Saturday Farmers Market. Get on your bike right now and roll on down.


    Say hi to Joey and all our SBBIKE and Don's Net Cafe volunteers.

  • September 25, 2014 2:56 PM | Sam Franklin (Administrator)

    The City of Santa Barbara installed a bike corral yesterday on the 100 block of Canon Perdido near Santa Barbara Street. Bike corrals are in-street bicycle parking areas that typically replace one or two automobile spaces in commercial areas where a significant number of bicycle trips are present. Other cities around the country have implemented bike corrals, mainly to respond to business and community desires to increase parking capacity – in this case 14 new bike parking spaces.

    The bike corral effort was led by the businesses located on Canon Perdido and Santa Barbara Streets. The business owners approached the City’s Public Works Department with a desire to increase and organize bicycle parking on this block of the Downtown. “The bike corral is a tool we are willing to try in order to meet businesses and community transportation needs,” said Rob Dayton, Principal Transportation Planner.

    Nine business owners in the area along with the Trust for Historic Preservation (El Presidio) supported the bike corral concept and location. These businesses requested the corral to meet the high level of existing bike parking demand. The total on-street number of car spaces on the block went from 31 to 30 and the green curb was extended to make room for another car.

    The Historic Landmark Commission granted design approval in July of this year following review by other City committees including: the City Council’s Sustainability Committee, the Downtown Parking Committee, and the Transportation and Circulation Committee. A simple, transparent design was chosen to best fit the historic neighborhood context and preserve views of El Presidio.

    The bike corral is a demonstration project to evaluate better access to the businesses in the area. It will be evaluated based on how well it is used and brought back to City committees to determine its effectiveness. Bike corral users, business owners, and customers will be asked to contribute to the assessment of the demonstration project.

  • September 25, 2014 2:03 PM | Ed France (Administrator)

    Short of actual construction, receiving funding is the most essential step for every public works projects. So many Bicycling and Pedestrian projects compete for such a small share of overall transportation funding that many important projects may never see the light of day.


    And that's why Santa Barbara and Goleta's impressive awarding of this coveted new source of funds is so critical. Projects funded are:

  • September 25, 2014 1:54 PM | Sam Franklin (Administrator)

    The City of Goleta is going to build a separated (Class 1) bike path on the south side of Hollister Av between Pacific Oaks and Ellwood School.   Goleta city staff sought and won a $1.644 million grant from the State of California’s new Active Transportation Program (ATP) to fund the new Hollister Class 1 Bike Path. The funding allows the City to move ahead with plans to construct, and likely complete, the Hollister bikeway next summer. We expect that this Safe Routes to Schools Project will give the children who attend Ellwood Elementary a new, viable, safe and healthy option to get to and from school by bicycle, and help further reduce motor vehicle traffic congestion and safety issues before and after school.


    Last month City of Goleta staff held an open house to unveil two alternative designs for a new 8-12ft on-street protected bikeway.  Certain design details were of concern to some bike advocates and neighbors, such as how the new bikeway would have stop signs at every intersection, as well as the high speed of motor vehicle traffic on Hollister adjacent to it.  One of those neighbors reached out to SBBIKE to discuss potential improvements to the design, and a number of interested members and neighbors met recently with an SBBIKE representative to share their concerns and ideas.  The top concern was about the safety of the bikeway for the children riding on it, particularly at the intersections, and there was consensus that the closer this bikeway design can approximate that of the existing Class I bikeway on El Colegio Rd, the better.  Ideas for traffic calming at the intersections included curb extensions to shorten the crosswalk length and slow cars crossing the bikeway, using yield signs instead of stop signs on the bikeway to accommodate rather than criminalize the expected behavior of cyclists, and raising the bike crossing to create a speed hump and a natural entrance to the neighborhoods along the Hollister side streets.




    As part of the Connecting Our Community campaign, we envision safe, continuous bikeways from Goleta to Carpinteria.  Since this bikeway will be the first piece of that vision and is part of the Caltrans Pacific Coast Bike Route (CPCBR) it is important that it be well-designed to encourage safe biking for kids and others who will ride it.


    The two bikeway design alternatives undefined one featuring the 12ft wide multi-use path depicted above, and the other adding an 8ft wide bike path next to the existing sidewalk undefined  will be presented for City Council approval at the end of October or early November of this year. Construction would start in late spring and would be completed next summer.  SBBIKE will continue to coordinate with interested neighbors, our members and the City of Goleta to ensure that the new bikeway gets the best design possible for the safety of all road users, and especially for the students of Ellwood Elementary School.

  • September 25, 2014 12:55 PM | Sam Franklin (Administrator)

    This week, the League of American Bicyclists recognized The Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (SBBIKE) with a Platinum Bicycle Friendly Business (BFBSM) award, while Deckers Outdoor Corporation received a gold medal and Rincon Cycles and Lynda.com received bronze medals, joining more than 800 visionary businesses and organizations from across the country.


    With the announcement of 150 new and renewing BFBs today in 39 states and Washington, D.C., SBBIKE, Deckers, Rincon Cycles and Lynda.com join a cutting-edge group of more than 800 local businesses, government agencies and Fortune 500 companies across the United States that are transforming the American workplace. In the past REI Santa Barbara and UCSB were also awarded Bicycle Friendly Business (BFBSM) awards.


    “Visionary business leaders are recognizing the real-time and long term impact that a culture of bicycling can create,” said Andy Clarke, President of the League of American Bicyclists. “We applaud this new round of businesses for investing in a more sustainable future for the country and a healthier future for their employees.”


    SBBIKE has been a frontrunner in bicycling advocacy since 1991, promoting better bicycle infrastructure as an easy option for transportation and providing amenities such as our community bicycle repair shop and a range of bicycle education programs.


    Ed France, Executive Director of SBBIKE said: “SBBIKE believes in leadership through example. It is refreshing to receive platinum status as a bicycle friendly business, but our objective is to help business leaders like Deckers, Lynda.com, and REI to emerge as leaders in bicycle friendly workplaces.”


    Moving forward, the award receiving companies will have access to a variety of free tools and technical assistance from the League to become even more bicycle-friendly. When members of our community bike, great things happen: businesses prosper, health care costs are reduced and our community becomes better connected and accessible for all while we enjoy the fun and health benefits of cycling along the Santa Barbara Coast.

  • September 25, 2014 8:56 AM | Ed France (Administrator)

    Sacramento CA – Imagine roadways that encourage respectful, cordial interaction among all users, and that are far safer, and even fun, for people on bikes. California has taken a big step towards the creation of exactly these types of roadways with Governor Brown’s approval this past Saturday of AB 1193, the Protected Bikeway Act.

     

    Authored by Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), and sponsored by the California Bicycle Coalition (CalBike), AB 1193 overturns an outdated Caltrans rule that had effectively prohibited local Californian agencies from building bike lanes with physical separation from car traffic. Instead, AB 1193 encourages the creation of modern, protected bike lanes that use planters, curbs, posts or parked cars to separate bikes from cars on busy streets. Find out more at https://calbike.org/media-room/.

     

    “This is a game changer for bike infrastructure in California,” said Ting. “Sharing the road is one thing but designing it better is another thing altogether.  By changing our streets, cycling can finally become a realistic transportation option for millions of Californians held back by safety concerns.”

     

    Used safely and effectively for years in the top bike-friendly cities of the world, such as Amsterdam (where 57% of the mode share in the city center is by bike) and Copenhagen (with a 37% bike mode share), protected bike lanes make urban bike riding a pleasant, practical and very safe way to make local trips - including getting children to and from school. Not coincidentally these two European cities also have a very high percentage of female bike riders which is not the case yet in the U.S.

     

    “For too long, our cities in California have focused on creating paint-only-as-the-boundary bike lanes for the few willing to ride in and next to traffic, in big part because that’s all they were allowed to do according to the guidelines. Now, they’ll be able to build protected bike lanes as a key part of bikeway networks that serve everyone interested in bicycling, not just the bold and athletic,” said Dave Snyder, the Executive Director of the California Bicycle Coalition.

     

    The Why of Protected Bike Lanes

    Key to the exponential growth of protected bike lanes across the country has been the  Green Lane Project of People for Bikes, which focuses on helping U.S. cities build better bike lanes to create low-stress streets. The Green Lane Project has gathered numerous reports that illustrate these safer lanes increase bike ridership by at least 50% and as much as 200%. Protected bike lanes also improve pedestrian safety by reducing sidewalk riding, and reduce auto on auto crashes by calming automobile traffic. Unsurprisingly, 96 percent of riders report feeling safer on protected bike lanes.

     

    "California is the number one state for bicycling participation and the home of a significant chunk of the U.S. bike industry," said Tim Blumenthal, president of the national bike movement PeopleForBikes. "The state's new support of protected bike lanes--its latest step to make bicycling better for everyone--will not only make bike riding safer and more appealing for Californians, but will also help reduce road congestion, spur economic growth and improve personal health."

     

    The number of protected bike lanes has almost quadrupled in the U.S. since 2010 with 210 protected bike lanes projected to be completed within the end of 2014. According to the Green Lane Project research California currently has 11 cities with protected bike lanes built, the most of any other state with San Francisco the stand out with 15, followed with both Long Beach and San Jose with 2 each.

     

    Put together the safety of all concerned, with the positive economic benefits of protected bike lanes, and you have a win/win scenario that cities across the nation are rapidly moving to be a part of.  It’s  reported that rents along New York City's Times Square pedestrian and bicycle paths increased 71% in 2010, and after the construction of a protected bike lane on 9th Avenue, local businesses saw a 49 percent increase in retail sales. Further a report from Portland State University found that customers who arrive by bike spent 24% more than those who arrive by bike shop more often and spend more per month.

     

    The Specifics on AB 1193

    AB 1193 changes the rules about bikeway design to free local governments from the outdated Caltrans guide that controlled bikeway design even on locally owned streets and roads. It gives communities a bigger toolbox, relying on nationally-recognized safety standards, and requires Caltrans to update its standards to encourage protected bikeways. It was sponsored by the California Bicycle Coalition, a network of sixteen local bicycle advocacy organizations across the state with 30,000 dues-paying members whose shared goal is the tripling bicycling in California for healthier, safer, more prosperous communities across the state. Encouraging protected bike lanes is a key strategy to attract more people to bicycling.

     

    California’s Commitment to Growing Bike Culture

    On September 16th 2014 Californian joined twenty-four other states enacting the “Three Feet for Safety.” The law went into effect as California’s state and local governments work to boost bicycling for improved health, reduced traffic congestion, and economic growth. Bicycling has increased 50% in California since 2000, according to the California Household Transportation Survey, with about two million bike trips daily in the Golden State.  Earlier this year California made an impressive jump from 19th to 9th in the annual Bicycle Friendly State rankings by the League of American Bicyclists. Further, the state Department of Transportation (Caltrans) says it’s working with its partners to infuse about $360 million into biking and other active transportation projects over the next three years while local sales taxes and the state’s cap-and-trade revenue are slated to contribute more than $1 billion to improve bicycling infrastructure.

     

    For the past 20 years CalBike has been focused on creating safer, healthier and more economically vibrant streets for California through the promotion of bike advocacy. 2014 has been a year of unprecedented success for CalBike. Please help us continue our groundbreaking work by donating today to our Build Better Bikeways Campaign: https://calbike.org/advocacy/better-bikeways/.

     

    ###

     

    About the California Bicycle Coalition

    CalBike enables more people to bicycle for the health, safety, and prosperity of all Californians. We envision millions of people riding bikes every day in California with networks of safe streets and paths conveniently connect every destination. Our goal is to double the amount of bicycling in the Golden State by 2017 and triple it by 2020.


    Calbike’s membership coalitions across the state include: Bike Bakersfield, Bike East Bay, Chico Velo Cycling, Inland Empire Bicycle Alliance, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, Marin County Bicycle Coalition, Napa County Bicycle Coalition, People Power of Santa Cruz County, Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates, San Diego County Bicycle Coalition, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, San Luis Obispo County Bicycle Coalition, Shasta Living Streets, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition, and Walk & Bike Mendocino. In 2013 CalBike launched the Women on Bikes California initiative


    Melissa Balmer
    Director Media Relations
    California Bicycle Coalition


  • September 20, 2014 8:49 AM | Howard Booth (Administrator)


    Joey and the SBBIKE Bike Valet crew will be at the Saturday Farmer's market on Cota Street today (September 20th) from 8am to 1pm.  


    Roll on out on September 27th for more bike valet at the Farmer's Market as part of the SOL Food Festival!

  • September 17, 2014 6:46 PM | Holly Starley (Administrator)

    Those who follow SBBIKE’s Facebook page have seen a taste of the joy shared among volunteers and a host of youthful cyclists at Saturday’s health fair on the west side. If a picture speaks a thousand words, the videos by SBBIKE board member Hector Gonzales, particularly this one showing two of the children who rode a bike for the first time that bright, scorching day, are a tome. In the quiet murmurs of exhilaration and the knitted eyebrows of fear overcome live a tale that reaches far into the future. These first pedal strokes depict thousands of miles of freedom, self-satisfaction, and adventure. Imbedded here are years of healthful exercise and environmentally sustainable transportation. In the interactions with volunteers like Hector and Mike Vergeer (in the video in the green and orange shirts respectively) lives a future of community connection and volunteerism and participation in what you believe in for generations to come.

    This, my friends, is the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition and its partners in the community (COAST, the city of Santa Barbara, Girls Inc., to name a few) at work for you!

    The story of Melissa and her brother

    That sweet little girl in the video wearing the blue shirt is six-year-old Melissa. I met Melissa right after she’d finished the bilingual safety basics class taught by SBBIKE board member Robert Caiza. She was practically vibrating with excitement. “What did you learn?” I asked her. She grinned and stuck out her left arm. “For when you turn.”

     

    “And wearing your helmet for safety,” prompted a smiling woman looking down lovingly from her side. Melissa’s hand involuntarily landed on the brand-new purple helmet atop her head (provided by COAST and SB City to all who took the safety class), and she smiled that mixture of pride and shyness only the innocence of youth can convey.

    “How do you feel about riding?” I wanted to know. Excited, duh. “I’m gonna ride with no training wheels!”

    Enter Hector. In the video, you see Melissa turn and call, “I’m doing it, Gina.”

    Gina, the woman by her side earlier, is Melissa and her seven-year-old brother’s foster mom. As Gina and I watched, Melissa’s brother rode the loop in front of the coalition’s booth over and over. He rode with a singleness of purpose--as if with each turn he made (each becoming smoother as he went), he was working through troubles in his mind. He rode fearlessly and with unbroken concentration, circling around the bright red poster board cutout of a car designed to teach new riders to stay out of the door zone and along the orange cones simulating street lanes. When he fell at one point, not quite braking before he got to the curb, I asked him if he was all right. He looked up at me only for a second, as if acknowledging the distraction of my question only out of politeness, and jumped back on the bike.

     

    Melissa’s brother, Gina told me, has been struggling. This day, this bike ride was the first time she’d seen him so engaged, so clearly enjoying something in the six months the kids have been with her. Though she’d been feeling under the weather lately, the broiling sun wasn’t an issue--seeing her foster kids so happy made it worth it.

    “I’m gonna buy the kids bikes,” Gina told me. She recently learned that the kids will be staying with her for another six months. And she’s looking forward to more days like this--days where Melissa and her brother can be kids riding bicycles without a care in the world.

     

    Having successfully ridden without training wheels, Melissa came over beaming. “[Before] I rode, I and I fell." She gestured to the distance spot of her earlier spill. "Then I rode and I fell.” She pointed in the other direction. “Now I don’t fall anymore.”

    Said Lynette Arnold, a volunteer with SBBIKE who’s active in its Spanish Outreach arm, “We’re seeing them learn to ride right in front of our eyes!” Thanks, Hector, for sharing a little of what an amazing experience that is with all of us.

    Saturday’s health fair was the third annual Santa Barbara Family Day and Health Fair. Bici Familia--the safety class, on-street instruction, and helmet giveaway--saw 115 participants, distributed 100 helmets, and taught more than 20 to ride for the first time.

    Photo: Melissa and Gina

  • September 17, 2014 5:02 PM | Christine Bourgeois (Administrator)

    Parents, did you pick up a flyer & a registration form for Pedal Power at Back to School Night this week? Students, what about that Pedal Power registration form that you picked up at Club Day and forgot at the bottom of your backpack? 

    Don't miss out! Act NOW: space is limited and it is not too late to register.


    Pedal Power is starting on Tuesday, September 23 at La Colina Junior High (only 6 Tuesdays & 6 Thursdays from 2:35-4:05pm)


    Pedal Power is starting on Wednesday, September 24 at Santa Barbara Junior High (only 6 Wednesdays & 6 Fridays from 2:35-4:05pm)


    Pedal Power is starting on Tuesday, September 30 at Goleta Valley Junior High (only 6 Tuesdays & 6 Thursdays from 2:35-4:05pm)


    Check our video

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Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition, PO Box 92047, Santa Barbara, CA 93190
Bici Centro, PO Box 91222, Santa Barbara, CA 93190
located at 506 E. Haley St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103
Phone: 805 617-3255
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