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  • September 20, 2012 10:43 AM | Ed France (Administrator)
    Are you still looking for the right after school program for your kids? Junior High School students at Fesler and Goleta Valley Junior high are already underway in the Earn-A-Bike, bicycle riding skills class called Pedal Power.

    At three south coast campuses, however, THERE IS STILL ONE WEEK TO REGISTER!- for the price of a $20 registration fee, students recieve 18 hours of accredited instruction & the opportunity to earn their very own bike, lock, lights & helmet!. Register today for SB Junior High, Carpinteria Middle School or La Colina Junior High at Youth Bike/Pedal Power
  • September 07, 2012 11:03 AM | Ed France (Administrator)
     Check it out: http://www.economist.com/node/21562252

    and Prof John Pucher (mentioned in article) is coming to SB in October 26th! (more details to follow)
  • August 28, 2012 12:10 PM | Ed France (Administrator)

    Assembly approves 3-foot passing bill

    3-feet-poster

    **BREAKING NEWS**

    Yesterday afternoon the California Assembly approved our three-foot passing bill by a 50-16 vote after a raucous debate that took nearly 30 minutes.

    Next steps for Senate Bill 1464 include a vote undefined largely procedural undefined in the Senate to formally concur with the technical amendments made to the bill by the Assembly. Then SB 1464 goes to the Governor for his signature, probably right after Labor Day.

    In the past 10 days thousands of bike-friendly Californians have urged their Assemblymembers to approve SB 1464. Many thanks to our allies at Transform for helping us generate such a big response.

    Our bill continues to enjoy strong support from bike advocacy organizations, bicycling clubs, bike manufacturers and retailers, and environmental and safety advocates, as well as thousands of bike-friendly individuals, with none of the organized opposition that fought SB 910, last year’s three-foot passing bill. Based on Gov. Brown’s comments following his veto of SB 910, we’re optimistic that he plans to sign this one.

    But the job isn’t finished until then, so we’ll continue publicizing the bill and soliciting support from individuals, organizations and businesses. To do this, we’re grateful for support from California bicycling legend Gary Fisher for our partner, the California Bicycle Coalition's fundraising campaign to help carry us through this final push and beyond. If you value our work to make California laws more bike-friendly, please become a member of the California Bicycle Coalition through joining SB BIKE

  • August 20, 2012 2:37 PM | Ed France (Administrator)

    Every year, volunteers at Bici Centro refurbish donated youth-sized bikes in order to make this program possible. The youth program is even subsidized by the adult sized bikes Bici refurbishes and sells as 'starter' commuter bikes. With over 50 bikes needed for this Fall, thewrenches at Bici Centro are working overtime to fill this demand. We currently have only half of the bicycles we'll need in order to provide bikes for all of our program participants.

    Click here for the back to school bike drive flyer!


    We are asking all of our networks to help us bring in 2nd hand bikes that can be refurbished by our volunteers. Please call us, email us, or simply bring any donations by, Tuesday thru Thursday of the next two weeks, from 4-7pm. We are hoping to bring in another 25 youth bikes, which are either mtb with 24" wheels, or Mtb frame sizes of 15" or 17".

  • August 15, 2012 10:57 AM | Ed France (Administrator)
    Bring used bikes to Bici Centro Aug 21-23rd from 4-7pm.

     

    Every year, volunteers at Bici Centro refurbish 100 donated youth-sized bikes in order to make the Pedal Power program possible. The youth program is even subsidized by the adult sized bikes Bici refurbishes and sells as 'starter' commuter bikes. With over 50 bikes needed for this Fall, thewrenches at Bici Centro are working overtime to fill this demand. We currently have only half of the bicycles we'll need in order to provide bikes for all of our program participants.


    We are asking all of our networks to help us bring in 2nd hand bikes that can be refurbished by our volunteers. Please call us, email us, or simply bring any donations by, Tuesday thru Thursday next week, from 3:30-7pm. We are hoping to bring in another 25 youth bikes, which are either mtb with 24" wheels, or Mtb frame sizes of 15" or 17".


    Where do the bikes go to? Youth across the county learning important bike safety skills:
    Do you or your friends have  kids at Carpinteria, Santa Barbara, La Colina, Goleta Valley, or Fesler(Santa Maria) Junior high schools? If so, make sure that they don't miss out on our expanding Pedal Power after-school offering. They learn the rules of the road, bike maintenance, and handling skills over 6 weeks, and end the program with their very own 'earned' refurbished bike, helmet, lock and lights.

     

    With the support of Measure A*, the coalition is able to offer this $250 class value for only a registration fee of $20. A bike means freedom to youth, but the responsibility to ride safely is a skill that must be taught. These programs are a step towards the Coalitions vision of universal access to bicycle 'drivers' education to youth throughout the county.

  • August 08, 2012 7:00 AM | Christine Bourgeois (Administrator)
    An excellent "Pedal On" article about Sharing the Road. Thanks to Howard Booth!

    Almost everything I know about sharing comes from either Sesame StreetMr. Rogers, or a wise marriage counselor. Sharing seems easy to me whether it’s my toys, cookies and milk, or the road. 

    Share the Road campaigns are targeted at educating road users to travel courteously and safely. Sharing requires education of all users about their rights and responsibilities, as well as how to behave courteously, safely, and visibly. A simple concept but implementation is often very difficult.

    There is a lot of information and there are lot of words written about Share the Road campaigns. I just did a quick Google search. There are 150 million references to those search terms. I’ve not looked at all of them. My back of the envelope calculation tells me that if I spent only two minutes looking at each, it would take me over 570 years to view all of them. I’m in reasonably good health, but even on my most optimistic days I don’t expect to be celebrating my 630th birthday!

    Even without going through all of those websites and posts, I know that some will passionately discuss the importance of all road-users being courteous. Many will be passionate advocates of either motorists’ or cyclists’ rights to the road. They’ll cast the other side as unthinking, self-centered villains. We’ve all heard and read the endless shouting and finger pointing. Motorists speed; cyclists don’t stop at stop signs. Cars bad and cyclists good, or cyclists evil and cars good. Welcome to yet another example of our highly partisan win-lose world.

    I’d like to ask, for the duration of this conversation and the inevitable comments that will follow, if we could please stop the usual polarized finger-pointing. I want us, together, to have a real discussion in which we state our views respectfully and, even more importantly, listen to what others are saying. I know that shouting is often easier than listening, but let’s try. We’ve all learned listening skills from our families, school, and work, or wise marriage counselors. Or the better children’s TV shows.

    Let me suggest two bold ideas. First: All road users have both rights and responsibilities. Second: Too often we’re focusing on the vehicles (cars or bikes) when we really should be talking about the behaviors of the folks driving or pedaling.

    Share the Road diamond signs and their white-painted road symbols, “sharrows,” are becoming ubiquitous in Santa Barbara and cities across the country. Their purpose is to educate motorists that they should share the road with cyclists. But at the same time they can create an us-versus-them mentality. Sharing implies that one party (motorists for example) have ownership and that they should be kind and polite and go against their “mine” instincts to share with cyclists, pedestrians, etc. See Bert and Ernie on Sesame Street trying to share a cookie. It’s not easy because Bert believes that the “cookie is for me.” We all know that, in the end, Ernie will trick him with a Share the Cookie campaign.

    Unlike Bert and Ernie, road users needn’t resort to trickery. Courts in virtually every state have ruled that people have a fundamental right to use the public ways, the roads, to move about the country. Within the limits set by state laws, motorists, truckers, motorcyclists, and bicyclists have the same rights to use the road. So long as your vehicle choice is one that is allowed by state law, and you obey the traffic laws, you have the right to use most public roadways for bicycle travel. All road users have them. Let’s be clear: All road users have the same rights.

    The problem isn’t with choice of vehicle; it’s with the person behind the wheel or on the saddle. Instead of cleaving the world into motorists versus cyclists I’d like to try a new construct: Ernies versus Berts. I believe that the world is divided between considerate road users who drive cars and ride bikes and others who are self-centered and only think about themselves. Thoughtful folks are aware of the world and people around them whether on a bike or in a car. The Ernies of the world stop at stop signs not because there’s a law that says they must, but because they care about the safety of others more than they care about saving three seconds on their daily commute. For the same reason, they slow down at intersections, look carefully before turning right, and travel at safe speeds. Berts are in a rush, thrill-seeking, late for an appointment, or pissed-off, and drive or cycle aggressively. Let’s be clear: All road users have responsibilities.

    Take a minute and close your eyes. Think about how you drove or biked this morning. Are you an Ernie or a Bert when you’re on the road? Be honest.

    I experienced a thoughtful interaction with a motorist recently. I had moved into the left-hand lane of Bath Street (out of the bike lane) because I was going to make a left turn at Micheltorena Street. As I waited at the light, a car was stopped on my right. The driver courteously leaned out of his window and asked me if I was going straight or making a turn. I said, “Left turn,” and let him turn ahead of me. Shocking! We communicated instead of scowling at each other as adversaries.

    There are hundreds of bike riders on the streets of Santa Barbra every day. Only a few race through intersections, ride on the sidewalk, or cycle the wrong way in the bike lanes. There are thousands of motorists, and only a few of them open car doors without looking, cut off cyclists, or pass too close out of anger. It happens, but it’s wrong to paint with a broad brush all motorists or cyclists. Simplistic thinking will not solve road usage conflicts or, for that matter, political problems.

    Remember, the keywords are “rights” and “responsibilities.” Now it’s time for comments. Road users: Before you hit “Post Your Comment,” take a minute and consider whether you are without sin.

  • August 02, 2012 12:20 PM | Ed France (Administrator)
    Support Jim 'C'This past weekend leading a youth BMX trip, Jim C a figure in our local bike community and Cranky's shop owner took a really bad crash and landed himself in the hospital. He was rushed into surgery and spent the past couple days in the hospital racking up some big bills. Jim has done so much for our community so if you feel like supporting this awesome guy the bike coalition has set up a donation site at www.bicicentro.org/ICF
    Support Jim C!!
  • August 02, 2012 10:33 AM | Ed France (Administrator)
    Tonight there will be a fundraiser for Jim C. at El Torito (29 E. Cabrillo Blvd), following Bike Moves. Plan to come around 9pm if you don't participate in the ride. So far generosity of bicyclists like you is flowing in for Jim C. We've raised over $1,500 and counting toward his medical bills. We'll know more soon, but that is still just a small fraction of the help he'll need. Come tonight or donate online:
    www.bicicentro.org/ICF
Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition, PO Box 92047, Santa Barbara, CA 93190
Bici Centro, PO Box 91222, Santa Barbara, CA 93190
located at 506 E. Haley St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103
Phone: 805 617-3255
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